Review: Our Lady of the Inferno by Preston Fassel

Our Lady of the Inferno by Preston Fassel
Fangoria Presents (September 2018)
376 pages; $13.50 paperback; $9.99 e-book
Reviewed by Blu Gilliand

Two women.

One is a businesswoman navigating the male-dominated world of the Staten Island landfill system. She is respected, if not entirely understood, by her peers.

The other is a businesswoman, too; she’s also a den mother of sorts, fighting hard for a group of girls who see her as protector and savior. Under her guidance, they navigate the flesh-for-cash trade of New York’s 42nd Street. She is both respected and feared by her peers.

One of these women is deeply, dangerously insane.Continue Reading

Review: Skullface Boy by Chad Lutzke

Skullface Boy by Chad Lutzke
CreateSpace (August 2018)

202 pages; $9.99 paperback; $2.99 e-book
Reviewed by Sadie “Mother Horror” Hartmann

This book had me at the dedication:

Dedicated to the bullied, the parentless and the unique. May the shallow assholes one day envy you.

Continue Reading

Review: The Sky Woman by J.D. Moyer

The Sky Woman: From Ringworlds to Earth, an Epic Struggle of Love and Survival by J.D. Moyer
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
288 pages; $24.95 paperback; $14.95 paperback; $6.99 e-book
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

The Sky Woman: From Ringworlds to Earth, an Epic Struggle of Love and Survival by J.D. Moyer deftly combines multiple genres into a solid work which starts out reading much like your typical fantasy fare but goes places I never anticipated.Continue Reading

Review: We Sold Our Souls by Grady Hendrix

We Sold Our Souls by Grady Hendrix
Quirk Books (September 18, 2018)
336 pages; $16.50 hardcover; $14.99 e-book
Reviewed by Blu Gilliand

The idea that rock ‘n roll is the Devil’s music is as old as a Robert Johnson blues riff. It’s an idea that’s been mined by countless musicians and writers over the years, to varying degrees of success. Leave it to Grady Hendrix, acclaimed author/historian of ’70s and ’80s horror fiction, to breathe new life into one of horror’s most well-worn tropes.Continue Reading

Review: Foe by Iain Reid

Foe by Iain Reid
Gallery/Scout Press (September 2018)

272 pages; $17.10 paperback; $11.99 e-book
Reviewed by Sadie “Mother Horror” Hartmann

Fans of Iain Reid’s first novel I’m Thinking of Ending Things already want this book. They’re looking for more of what he delivered in his debut novel — that  “unique, slightly off-kilter, unsettling prose that grabs you and pulls you into the story until it’s over” kind of thing. Rest assured, he’s done it again.Continue Reading

Review: The Siren and the Specter by Jonathan Janz

The Siren and the Specter by Jonathan Janz
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
288 pages; $24.95 hardcover; $14.95 paperback; $6.99 e-book
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

It was almost two years ago Jonathan Janz first came to my attention. I kept hearing about his novel, Children of the Dark. This is what I said in my review of that workThis is one time where all of the hype was dead on.Continue Reading

Review: Thirteen Days by Sunset Beach by Ramsey Campbell

Thirteen Days by Sunset Beach by Ramsey Campbell
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
288 pages; $24.95 hardcover; $14.95 paperback
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

No one writes horror like Ramsey Campbell, as evidenced by numerous accolades over the years, including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Horror Writers Association, and the Living Legend Award of the International Horror Guild.

Thirteen Days by Sunset Beach is the latest book I’ve read from new publisher Flame Tree Press, and based on what I’ve seen so far, they will be a welcome addition to the marketplace. Continue Reading

Review: Severance by Ling Ma

Severance by Ling Ma
Farrar, Straus & Giroux (August 2018)
304 pages; $19.60 hardcover; $13.99 e-book
Reviewed by Blu Gilliand

I’ve read a post-apocalyptic novel or two in my day, and a common thread that runs through them is that when the bomb drops or the plague hits or whatever apocalyptic thing it is that happens happens, people stop going to work. The apocalypse, it seems, is an unimpeachable reason to play hooky.

Not so in Ling Ma’s entertaining, thought-provoking debut novel, Severance. In Severance, when the apocalyptic thing happens — in this case it’s a disease called Shen Fever — the unaffected minority keep going to work. For some, it’s a coping mechanism. For others, it’s the promise of a hefty bonus, or the idea that their loyalty to the company will get them ahead when this all blows over.

For Candace Chen, it’s a case of not knowing what else to do.Continue Reading

Review: Zombie Apocalypse in Ditmas Park

Zombie Apocalypse in Ditmas Park by Kristine Scheiner
CreateSpace (May 2017)

32 pages, $6.99 paperback
Reviewed by Joshua Gage

Zombie Apocalypse in Ditmas Park: A NYC Coloring Book Adventure for Ghoulish Hacks to Chillax is exactly what it sounds like. New York is invaded by zombies, and the rich blew up the bridges, so Brooklyn is left to fend for itself. Readers follow the adventures of the Scheiner sisters as they prepare for a Zombie Apocalypse Party. What ensues is a joyful romp through a zombie-filled wasteland rich with in-jokes that would make any zombie fan or New Yorker proud.Continue Reading

Review: The Bad Neighbor by David Tallerman

The Bad Neighbor by David Tallerman
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
288 pages; $24.85 hardcover; $14.95 paperback; 
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

There’s a new publisher I think we’re going to hear a lot about in the coming months.  They call themselves Flame Tree Press and they plan to publish both established authors and new voices in horror and the supernatural, crime and mystery thrillers, as well as science fiction and fantasy. Continue Reading

Review: Bones by Andrew Cull

Bones by Andrew Cull
CreateSpace (June 2018)

212 pages; $11.95 paperback; $5.49 e-book
Reviewed by Sadie Hartmann

I’ve been saying a different version of the same thing all year but I’ll say it in a unique way for Cemetery Dance:

Social media is responsible for introducing me to a much larger selection of books to read in my favorite genre of horror. Way back when, whatever my mom added to her shelves was what was accessible to me. As I began to shop for books on my own, I was only getting whatever was available at the bookstore, library or thrift stores.

In other words: Traditionally published books.

These days, I’m like a child set loose in a candy store! So many books, so little time! A book that came into view at the beginning of summer is this self-published collection of four short stories called Bones by Andrew Cull.Continue Reading

Review: Creature by Hunter Shea

Creature by Hunter Shea
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
282 pages; $24.95 paperback; $14.95 paperback
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

Yes, I consider myself a Hellion. That’s how Hunter Shea refers to his most ardent followers. I can’t say I’ve read every one of his books (he’s remarkably prolific), but I’ve yet to read one I didn’t care for.

Creature is the second book I’ve read from new publisher  Flame Tree Press, who looks to publish both established authors and new voices in horror and the supernatural, crime and mystery thrillers, as well as science fiction and fantasy. It’s also a bit of a diversion for Hunter. It’s easily his most personal work to date. Sure, there’s a monster, that’s evident from the title, but this book is so much more.Continue Reading

Review: An Ideal Vessel by Sarah Hans

An Ideal Vessel by Sarah Hans
Dragon’s Roost Press (May 2018)

140 pages; $9.99 paperback; $7.99 e-book
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

Before I get into this, you need to answer a question for yourself: Are you prepared for latter-Victorian automatons possessed by ages-old paladins squaring off against demons? The answer to that question directly affects your interest in Sarah Hans’ debut novella, An Ideal Vessel. Continue Reading

Review: Body of Christ by Mark Matthews

Body of Christ by Mark Matthews
CreateSpace (January 2018)
94 pages; $7.99 paperback; $0.99 e-book
Reviewed by Chad Lutzke

I picked up this book for review at just the right time. Horror has bored me as of late. I’m seeing a lot of the same tropes. Blood here, blood there. Running from monsters, maniacal cannibals, and other dead horses. These things do nothing for me. They’re good on the screen when you’re in the mood for a body count, but in the written word, for me, it’s trudging through mud I’d rather have walked around. My eye starts to wander toward my small shelf of Nicholas Sparks and Louis L’Amour spines — none of which I’ve read, but have wondered if I’m missing a good time. I’m okay with losing horror points for that little confession. For me, there are no guilty pleasures. Just good books, good music, good movies.Continue Reading

Review: Lost Films edited by Max Booth III and Lori Michelle

Lost Films edited by Max Booth III and Lori Michelle
Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing (August 2018)

226 pages, $18.95 paperback; $6 e-book
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

We all love films, both personal home videos and big screen productions. They become a part of our lives. But what do we do when our lives interweave with the celluloid?Continue Reading