The Best of The Scream Factory: Already Rolling at the Printer and Shipping in June!

We’re pleased to report we’ve sent another very special new project to the printer and we expect it to sell VERY quickly due to the book’s exclusive nature and low print run!

From 1988 to 1997, The Scream Factory: The Magazine of Horrors Past, Present and Future provided an exhaustive and often irreverent overview of all aspects of horror–from fiction to film and beyond. It became a go-to reference for horror aficionados around the globe. Twenty years after the magazine ceased publication, editors Peter Enfantino, Robert Morrish, and John Scoleri have sifted through the contents of the magazine’s 20-issue run to assemble this epic collection.

In addition to the nearly 600-page selection of “greatest hits,” the editors have penned a brand new 25,000 word introduction, diving deep into the sordid history of the magazine as well as the books published (and even a few unpublished!) under the Deadline Press imprint.

THIS BOOK IS A MASSIVE DOORSTOP. We’ve posted a photo on the product page of the first finished approval copy from the printer, but even that doesn’t really show the sheer size of the book!

Limited to just 450 numbered copies and 52 lettered copies, there are NO plans for any other editions at this time, so this could end up being an extremely hard to find collectible in the future.

The Best of The Scream Factory

Read more or place your order while supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Review: Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews edited by Sam Weller

Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews edited by Sam Weller
Hat and Beard Press (2018)
224 pages; $45 hardcover; $200 limited edition
Reviewed by Kevin Lucia

I’ll speak more at length about this when I discuss the influence Ray Bradbury has had on me in a future edition of my column Revelations, but suffice to say: I discovered his work late in life. I’m sure I was assigned several of his short stories in junior high and high school—probably the oft-assigned “All Summer in a Day,” “Soft Rains Will Come” or maybe even “The Fun They Had”—but I never had a teacher really bring me to Ray Bradbury. This is probably why—as most of my former and present students will attest—I’ve made it my personal mission to ensure that all my students experience the work of Ray Brabdury while they’re in my class. Whether they love his work, are ambivalent toward it, or don’t like it, they’ll never be able to say they don’t know who Ray Bradbury is, or what his place is in American Literature. Continue Reading

Review: Roam by Erik Therme

Roam by Erik Therme
Self-Published (January 2017)
244 pages; $9.99 paperback; $2.99 e-book
Reviewed by Josh Black

Roam, Erik Therme’s third novel, begins in deceptively typical fashion. A broken down car, and a couple of kids with no cell reception. Continue Reading

TEN Volumes of the Dark Screams Anthology Series Available For Immediate Download!

Don’t forget, all TEN volumes in the acclaimed Dark Screams horror eBook anthology series are now available for immediate download!

Dark Screams Volume One

Dark Screams Volume Two

Dark Screams Volume Three

Dark Screams Volume Four

Dark Screams Volume Five

Dark Screams Volume Six

Dark Screams Volume Seven

Dark Screams Volume Eight

Dark Screams Volume Nine

Dark Screams Volume Ten

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Review: The Goat Parade by Peter Dudar

The Goat Parade by Peter Dudar
Grinning Skull Press (March 2018)
300 pages; $23.58 paperback; $3.99 e-book
Reviewed by Dave Simms

Peter Dudar hit the scene hard with his Stoker finalist A Requiem For Dead Flies, offering a style that evoked the best of Bentley Little and Rick Hautula. He returns with The Goat Parade, a novel that hits the gas full throttle in a thrilling supernatural tale that might remind readers of some other guy from Maine.Continue Reading

Review: The Boulevard Monster by Jeremy Hepler

The Boulevard Monster by Jeremy Hepler
Bloodshot Books (April 2017)
300 pages; $14.99 paperback; $3.99 e-book
Reviewed by Chad Lutzke

Once in a while I’ll start a review with some poetic prose plucked from the pages to give the reader an idea of the skills the writer may possess.  The Boulevard Monster has none of that. Instead, it’s a straightforward, entertaining story with a thrilling Koontz-ish vibe…and the best book I’ve read so far this year. There’s good reason it was nominated for a Stoker award. Hepler’s no-filler prose is designed to simply tell a story with no literary glitter, which makes perfect sense considering the protagonist. Continue Reading

Review: The Lamb Will Slaughter the Lion by Margaret Killjoy

The Lamb Will Slaughter the Lion by Margaret Killjoy
Tor Books (August 2017)

130 pages, $10.39 paperback; $3.99 e-book
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

Brace yourself for this one, friendos, because it gets pretty weird here. I know. I know. Whodathunk a book about crustpunks that summon a demonic deer to protect their squat only to have the demondeer turn on them would be weird. Odd how that works.Continue Reading

Review: Slashvivor! by Stephen Kozeniewski and Stevie Kopas

Slashvivor! by Stephen Kozeniewski and Steve Kopas
Sinister Grin Press (September 2017)
296 pages; $16.99 paperback, $3.99 e-book
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

It’s 1983. An accidental nuclear war has left the U.S. with just 1% of its former 234 million residents. Stephen Kozeniewski and Stevie Kopas have created such a world and have decided to have some fun with it. Take for example the tagline for the TV ads for Albino Al’s Discount Surplus: “Come on down! It’s not illegal. In the Geiger Lands, nothing is!”Continue Reading

Dead Trees: Others by James Herbert

When you bring up the pioneers of hardcore, extreme horror fiction, you’re most likely to hear names like Jack Ketchum and Richard Laymon. As well you should, because these guys were important—important to the fans who were raised on George Romero, Tobe Hooper, etc., and wished to read more than traditional supernatural horror. We wanted, or perhaps we needed, to see the genre tackle more explicit subject matter.

But as great as Ketchum and Laymon are, James Herbert was there first. It’s almost hard to believe now, but Herbert’s first book, a gruesome novel called The Rats, came out in the same year as Stephen King’s Carrie.Continue Reading

Review: Unbury Carol by Josh Malerman

Unbury Carol by Josh Malerman
Del Rey (April 10, 2018)
384 pages; $24.54 hardcover; $12.99 e-book
Reviewed by Blu Gilliand

I had certain expectations for Unbury Carol. That was foolish. I should know by now, after reading much of Josh Malerman’s output (except, somehow, the one that got everybody talking about him to begin with: Bird Box), that he is not going to deliver the expected. So, when I allowed the title and the synopsis and the cover to lead me to expectations of a western/horror hybrid that would be a dark cross between a fairy tale and a Hammer movie…well, I should have known that wasn’t what I was going to get.Continue Reading

The Washingtonians Signed Limited Edition Hardcover Selling Very Quickly!

We’re pleased to report we’ve sent a very special new project to the printer and we expect it to sell VERY quickly due to the book’s exclusive nature and low print run!

The Washingtonians by Bentley Little is an oversized Signed Limited Edition Hardcover that collects Bentley’s original story, the original TV script by Richard Chizmar and Johnathon Schaech, an introduction by Mick Garris, and dozens of photos from the set that have never been published anywhere in the world.

Limited to just 500 numbered copies signed by Little, Chizmar, Schaech, and Garris, there are NO plans for any other editions at this time, so this could end up being an extremely hard to find book in the future.

The Washingtonians

Read more or place your order while supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Review: Skyjack by K.J. Howe

Skyjack by K.J. Howe
Quercus (April 10, 2018)
400 pages; $26.99 hardcover; $12.99 e-book
Reviewed by Dave Simms

Last year’s surprise thriller by K.J. Howe, The Freedom Broker, hit the field hard, introducing both a razor sharp writer and a series featuring Thea Paris, a character tough enough to stand toe-to-toe with Reacher and Repairman Jack. The kidnap and rescue team delves into dark territories that combine the thriller aspects with a character development rarely found in the genre.Continue Reading

Brian Keene’s History of Horror Fiction, Chapter Five: 12th Century Feminist Werewolf Fiction

We’ve explored how the supernatural informed much of humankind’s early written works, from the various texts of the world’s religions to cultural folklore and myths to fiction. Eventually, one religion began to influence them all. Around the same time that anonymous writer was penning Beowulf, the Roman Catholic church’s first official accusation of real-life Satanism took place in the French city of Toulouse. 

Continue Reading

Review: Witches by Donna Lynch and Steven Archer

Witches by Donna Lynch and Steven Archer
Raw Dog Screaming Press (March 2018)

66 pages, $23.06 paperback
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

I never read Daughters of Lilith, the previous literary/artistic collaboration between Donna Lynch and Steven Archer. Why have I never read it? Seriously, because Witches is a wonderful, odd bit of joy in the world.

Let’s start with the obvious: $25 is a bit intimidating when looking at a book of poetry, especially one this short. But, as much as it feels weird saying these words in this specific order, this is more than just a book of poetry. It is also more than just a book of art. It’s the combination of the two and how they mesh and interact to create something that, to beg forgiveness for the cliché, is much more than the sum of its parts.Continue Reading

Review: The Nightmare Room by Chris Sorensen

The Nightmare Room by Chris Sorensen
Harmful Monkey Press (January 2018)
274 pages; $10.99 paperback, $2.99 e-book
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

At it’s heart, The Nightmare Room (The Messy Man Series Book 1) is a ghost story and a very good one to boot. Here’s a killer opening line for you…

The boy woke to the sound of his screams.Continue Reading