Walking Alone by Bentley Little: Get a 1st/1st Trade Hardcover While You Can!

For those who missed the news, we still have copies of the 1st Printing, 1st Edition trade hardcover of Walking Alone by Bentley Little available via our online store!

Walking Alone

Read more or place your order while our supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Video Visions: I, Robot Lover

I grew up obsessed with robots. How I haven’t run off with a replicant is a mystery to me.

When I was a wee lad, there was a particular show I watched with my mother every single day that sparked my infatuation with, as the show’s evil/comedic doctor would call them, “ferrous Frankenstein fiends in tin clothing.” That show was Lost In Space — the original from the ’60s, not the okay reboot on Netflix. Continue Reading

Cardinal Black by Robert McCammon: The Next Thrilling Matthew Corbett Adventure!

More big news this month for Robert McCammon fans! We’re thrilled to announce we’ll be publishing his new novel, Cardinal Black, which is the latest installment in his incredible Matthew Corbett series!

(Don’t worry if you haven’t read the series yet, this novel is a terrific stand-alone read, too. McCammon really balances the story for both die-hard fans of the series and new readers!)

About the Book:
Cardinal Black is the newest installment in Robert McCammon’s unique series of historical thrillers featuring Matthew Corbett, professional problem solver, who has been called “the Early American James Bond.”

December 1703 finds Berry Grigsby living as Mary Lynn Nash in a small Welsh village where she has fallen victim to Professor Fell’s involuntary drug experiments. Her mind is quickly deteriorating under the drug’s influence, and the only way to save her is a potion book that was stolen in an attack on the village orchestrated by a mysterious madman going by the name Cardinal Black.

Matthew Corbett has volunteered to travel with Julian Devane, a self-proclaimed “fool and bad man” in the employ of Professor Fell, to hunt down the potion book. They follow the trail to London, where the book will be sold at a secret auction. Matthew and Julian manage to secure a seat at the auction by masquerading as respected and feared underground operatives, but to prevail in their high-stakes mission, they will require help from a very unlikely source. Even if they are successful, their race to save Berry Grigsby will leave a trail of destruction in its wake.

Cardinal Black is another extraordinary achievement from one of America’s most skilled authors, and it features some of the most memorable, compelling, and chilling characters in the Matthew Corbett series to date, each with their own competing agendas. This masterful historical adventure is perfectly balanced for long-time fans of the series and new readers alike who are now joining the adventure.

Cardinal Black

Read more or place your order while our supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Review: Bones by Andrew Cull

Bones by Andrew Cull
CreateSpace (June 2018)

212 pages; $11.95 paperback; $5.49 e-book
Reviewed by Sadie Hartmann

I’ve been saying a different version of the same thing all year but I’ll say it in a unique way for Cemetery Dance:

Social media is responsible for introducing me to a much larger selection of books to read in my favorite genre of horror. Way back when, whatever my mom added to her shelves was what was accessible to me. As I began to shop for books on my own, I was only getting whatever was available at the bookstore, library or thrift stores.

In other words: Traditionally published books.

These days, I’m like a child set loose in a candy store! So many books, so little time! A book that came into view at the beginning of summer is this self-published collection of four short stories called Bones by Andrew Cull.Continue Reading

Review: Creature by Hunter Shea

Creature by Hunter Shea
Flame Tree Press (September 6, 2018)
282 pages; $24.95 paperback; $14.95 paperback
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

Yes, I consider myself a Hellion. That’s how Hunter Shea refers to his most ardent followers. I can’t say I’ve read every one of his books (he’s remarkably prolific), but I’ve yet to read one I didn’t care for.

Creature is the second book I’ve read from new publisher  Flame Tree Press, who looks to publish both established authors and new voices in horror and the supernatural, crime and mystery thrillers, as well as science fiction and fantasy. It’s also a bit of a diversion for Hunter. It’s easily his most personal work to date. Sure, there’s a monster, that’s evident from the title, but this book is so much more.Continue Reading

This Dark Chest of Wonders: 40 Years of Stephen King’s The Stand!

We’re extremely happy to report we’ll be publishing This Dark Chest of Wonders: 40 Years of Stephen King’s The Stand by Andy Burns later this year!

This very special volume tells the story behind the story of King’s enduring opus and delves deep into its various incarnations — the unfilmed George A. Romero adaptation; the 1994 ABC mini-series; the audiobook; and Marvel Comics’ adaptation.

Included are exclusive interviews with Stephen King experts Bev Vincent, Robin Furth, Mick Garris, Jamey Sheridan, WG Snuffy Walden, Grover Gardner, Ralph Macchio, Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, and Mike Perkins.

This Dark Chest of Wonders: 40 Years of Stephen King’s The Stand delivers a complete and uncut look into one of Stephen King’s most enduring achievements!

Dark Chest of Wonders

Read more or place your order while our supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

My First Fright featuring Ania Ahlborn

Ania Ahlborn

I grew up with two younger sisters who probably owned five million dolls between the two of them. They had plenty of mass-market stuff like Barbies and Cabbage Patch Kids, but also a few “lifelike” porcelain dolls. I wouldn’t say that these dolls “scared” me, but there always was something more mysterious and unsettling about them, with their stiff, white bodies and old-timey dresses.

From Child’s Play to Annabelle to the Twilight Zone episode “Living Doll,” dolls have been mined for their horror potential for a long time. What is it about dolls that makes them so freaky? Author Ania Ahlborn has some thoughts. She saw a doll-centric horror movie early on in life that left such a impression on her, she went on to write scary stories of her own.Continue Reading

Review: An Ideal Vessel by Sarah Hans

An Ideal Vessel by Sarah Hans
Dragon’s Roost Press (May 2018)

140 pages; $9.99 paperback; $7.99 e-book
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

Before I get into this, you need to answer a question for yourself: Are you prepared for latter-Victorian automatons possessed by ages-old paladins squaring off against demons? The answer to that question directly affects your interest in Sarah Hans’ debut novella, An Ideal Vessel. Continue Reading

Usher’s Passing by Robert McCammon: Brand New Signed Limited Edition Just Announced!

We’re thrilled to report our next Robert McCammon signed & slipcased Limited Edition hardcover will be his classic novel, Usher’s Passing.

This title is already 80% SOLD OUT and these remaining copies will go FAST, so please do not wait to place your order! There’s nothing we can do for you once they’re all reserved!

Usher's Passing

Read more or place your order while our supplies last!

Thank you, as always, for your continued support and enthusiasm!

Review: Body of Christ by Mark Matthews

Body of Christ by Mark Matthews
CreateSpace (January 2018)
94 pages; $7.99 paperback; $0.99 e-book
Reviewed by Chad Lutzke

I picked up this book for review at just the right time. Horror has bored me as of late. I’m seeing a lot of the same tropes. Blood here, blood there. Running from monsters, maniacal cannibals, and other dead horses. These things do nothing for me. They’re good on the screen when you’re in the mood for a body count, but in the written word, for me, it’s trudging through mud I’d rather have walked around. My eye starts to wander toward my small shelf of Nicholas Sparks and Louis L’Amour spines — none of which I’ve read, but have wondered if I’m missing a good time. I’m okay with losing horror points for that little confession. For me, there are no guilty pleasures. Just good books, good music, good movies.Continue Reading

Why Is Non-US Shipping So Expensive?

Here is a frequently asked question we receive from our friends and collectors outside the USA:

Why Is Non-US Shipping So Expensive?

The answer is really simple, unfortunately: the United States Post Office charges us a lot of money to ship books outside the United States.

An example:
Here is a screenshot of the shipping page for a book headed to Canada as charged via our website:

Shipping

Here is a screenshot of the options we receive when we go to the USPS website, enter the package details manually (size, weight, etc), and select shipping from our warehouse address to that same address in Canada:

Shipping

We agree 100% with you — we want shipping costs to be less expensive! When our Non-US customers choose not to order due to the high price of postage, that only hurts us and our authors. (And we don’t blame them for their decision — these costs are crazy!)

Sometimes we’re told Amazon.com doesn’t charge nearly as much as we do for shipping. We’re sure they don’t. They’re a billion dollar corporation that ships millions (or billions?) of packages every year. They certainly get the very best rate offered by every vendor they deal with. They may also have distribution facilities in other regions, so they can ship enormous groups of orders via bulk freight to the destination country.

In addition, Amazon could be purposely losing money on the shipping costs, so you’ll return again and again and spend more money on future purchases. (In this case, the reduced shipping would be what is considered a “loss leader” in the retail trade.)

Sometimes we’re told that sellers on eBay charge less for shipping, but in many cases, it turns out they’re sending the book in a small envelope with no packing material, protection, or insurance. We always ship books overseas in boxes with packing material — never in a padded envelope!

Folks have asked if we could try UPS or Fed-Ex for outside the US, and we have experimented with them, but the customers reported being charged additional “handling fees” and “processing fees” in addition to their usual taxes on the delivery. The fees were imposed by the shipping companies and had nothing to do with us or the destination country.

So, in the end, we charge our collectors what we’re charged by the USPS for shipping their package. We cannot, unfortunately, afford to charge less.

We are acutely aware of how the USPS postage rates affect our customers and we do wish there was a better option.

If you live in Europe, we highly recommend you check out the Cemetery Dance titles listed on the PS Publishing website in the UK. Peter Crowther has been a good friend of ours for many years and we’re pleased to send collectors his way. He also publishes many fine books each year.

If you know of a store in Canada or Australia that might like to become the official Storefront for Cemetery Dance Publications in that country, please let us know about them. We’d be happy to discuss the possibilities!

Thank you again, as always, for your continuing support!

Dead Trees: Shockwaves by Thomas Tessier

It was the early years of my decades-long love affair with horror fiction. I blazed through the Stephen King books that had been published at the time, with Pet Semetery being the most current. It was 1983 — a very good year for the genre, with even better things were on the immediate horizon. I eagerly devoured the Peter Straub books that were available, and they were among the finest pieces of fiction I had ever read. I enjoyed books by James Herbert, Whitley Strieber, Ramsey Campbell, John Farris. I read landmark novels by brilliant talents such as F. Paul Wilson and T.E.D. Klein. There were numerous markets for short fiction, and I was blown away by pieces from Karl Edward Wagner, Richard Christian Matheson, and Dennis Etchison. And of course I marveled at the works of Charles L. Grant. The field was on fire, and it was an incredible time to be a fan.Continue Reading

Review: Lost Films edited by Max Booth III and Lori Michelle

Lost Films edited by Max Booth III and Lori Michelle
Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing (August 2018)

226 pages, $18.95 paperback; $6 e-book
Reviewed by Anton Cancre

We all love films, both personal home videos and big screen productions. They become a part of our lives. But what do we do when our lives interweave with the celluloid?Continue Reading

Review: Bad Man by Dathan Auerbach

Bad Man by Dathan Auerbach
Doubleday (August 7, 2018)
400 pages; $26.95 paperback; $12.99 e-book
Reviewed by Frank Michaels Errington

Eric, aged three, disappears at the grocery store while under the care of his older brother, Ben. Every parent’s worst nightmare. The rising panic woven through this scene was incredibly well written.

I can’t say I liked everything about Bad Man. Early on, I was enjoying the read but found myself searching for the story. There was one red herring, in particular, which I was less than fond of. But, I will say Dathan Auerbach is a very capable writer, deserving of his success.Continue Reading

Review: Night of 1,000 Beasts by John Palisano

Night of 1,000 Beasts by John Palisano
(April 2018)
208 pages; $14.95 paperback; $2.99 e-book
Reviewed by R.B. Payne

The scariest things at a ski resort are normally daily ticket prices, $20 hot dogs, and the prospect of a twisted ankle or broken neck. This is hardly true in the gripping Night of 1000 Beasts by John Palisano, in which a hot-shot group of skiers find themselves in a horrific cosmic event where it becomes obvious that some of them have taken their last lift ride to the top.Continue Reading