News From The Dead Zone #50

Breaking News from the Dead Zone

The Haven Foundation will be offering a very limited supply of signed books by Stephen King each month. The January selection is Secret Window. This was published as an exclusive Book-of-the-Month Club anthology of hard-to-find non-fiction pieces, little-known interviews, short stories, and articles, with an Introduction by Peter Straub. It was intended as a companion to On Writing. Copies will go on sale at 12 PM on Monday, January 15th (eastern time zone) and will be on an ‘as supplies last’ basis. They may be purchased at the Haven Foundation store. Unsigned hardcover copies of other King titles will also be available for purchase at the original cover price plus shipping. Many of these are now out-of-print in the hardcover edition. New titles will be added as they become available, so check back often for current inventory.

Through The Signed Page, Richard Isanove, the colorist of The Gunslinger Born, will be signing copies of the comic book for those who can’t meet him at New York Comic Con in February. Here’s a new interview with scripter Peter David and cover art from issue 3 and an interview with Jae Lee.

Stay tuned for an in depth interview with King at Lilja’s Library. He reported yesterday, “Abiut an hour ago I hung up the phone after doing a 45 minute long phone interview with King himself. Yes, you heard correct. Hearing ‘Hello Hans? Steve King…’ when I answered the phone was probably one of the weirdest (in a very good way) things I have ever experienced.”

You can buy the original cover art or prints of Edward Miller’s cover art for the PS Publishing edition of The Colorado Kid here.

Dorman T. Shindler reviewed Secretary of Dreams in the St. Louis Dispatch. He called it “a Twilight Zone-like anthology featuring illustrated works by Stephen King that are reminiscent of the EC horror comics the author professes to love. The tales gathered here—featuring hordes of invading zombies, a haunted truck and a ‘storm’ of frogs—are well-suited to the treatment. And Glen[n] Chabourne’s pen and ink, nightmarish, illustrations (featuring lots of skeletal detail, rotting skin and deranged stares) is the perfect accompaniment. The difference here is that none of King’s words is edited, so the illustrations enhance rather than replace the prose. That makes for near perfection when it comes to King’s 1981 World Fantasy-winning story, ‘The Reach,’ a story Joyce Carol Oates once termed elegantly composed.” Here’s the transcript of Glenn Chadbourne’s recent chat.